Ice Painting – Camp Sewing With Boys

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Today we have Katie from Stitchbox here on Camp Sewing With Boys. Have you checked out Stitchbox yet? It is a monthly subscription where you get everything you need to sew a project each month. Katie is showing us how to Ice Paint, his is something you will definitely want to do.

I decided a few weeks ago I wanted to try some ice dyeing with my son, and thought we should do pillowcases for when our family goes camping. I hate taking the regular pillows and pillowcases and having them come home smelling like campfire smoke, and I figured if they had cool new pillowcases, it might convince my kids to actually sleep on the pillows when we go camping, instead of trying to stay up all night!  It’s worth a shot, right? It’s summer in Texas, and the heat is typically somewhere between unbearable and completely ridiculous. But, of course, when it was time to start our project, we’re in the middle of some crazy rain every day for nearly a week (Tropical Storm Bill, anyone?)!

 

So we improvised, and did the project under our patio. The ice melted a little slower, but we still had fun!

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 So here’s what we started with:  a set of 100% cotton white pillowcases, a tie dye kit (although regular fabric dye packets will work for this, too, I liked the colors offered in this kit and knew we could do several projects this summer with it), a bucket or plastic tub, metal cooling rack or tray to keep the fabric elevated so the dye will drain from the fabric, and a pitcher of ice!

I followed the pretreat instructions on the tie dye kit for our fabric, which said to wash the pillowcases in hot water and then make sure they’re still wet when you’re ready to dye them.  I filled four of the little tie dye kit bottles with the powdered dye in the colors my son wanted to use: lime green, red, orange, and blue.  You can choose to leave them in the plastic packages, or even put them into bowls, but working with my 4-year-old and his little sister, who is 3, I knew I didn’t want them having open access to the dye!  If you’re doing regular tie dye, now is when you’d add water to those bottles, but for ice dyeing, leave them dry.

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Take your supplies outside (in the sun if possible), and set the metal rack on top of the tub. Arrange your pillowcases on the rack however you’d like.  My son chose to roll his up a little and then just plop it down, but my daughter let me leave hers mostly flat and just scrunch it smaller, making little wrinkles and hills all over.  Next, cover them completely with ice.  We used a mix of regular ice and crushed ice, and I think the crushed ice was easier for them to get onto the fabric and make it stay without it trying to fall off like the bigger pieces.

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Once your pillowcases are covered with ice, use the bottles of powdered dye to squeeze little puffs of dye onto the ice.  Try to convince the kiddos not to touch the ice, which will be saturated with very concentrated dye!  Completely cover the ice with dye, and let the ice melt and drip into the tub below.

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When the ice is melted, the pillowcases need to stay damp for 5-6 hours so the dye can really soak in, so I covered ours with plastic wrap to keep the moisture in.

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After several hours, bring the tub inside and rinse the pillowcases in cold water until the water runs mostly clear. Then wash them twice in the washing machine – the first time with no detergent, and the second time with detergent, both times using warm water.  Dry the pillowcases on low heat in the dryer (or hang them to dry, if you prefer, but know that the dye will set more permanently if you go ahead and dry them).

There you go! Perfect camping pillowcases!  My son loves how his colors all ran together and made an almost camo effect, and my daughter’s favorite part is the big section of red on her pillowcase!

The more colors you layer on top of one another on the ice, the more color mixing you’ll get (like my son’s).  On my daughter’s, I convinced her to not add other colors on top of one another so we could see them stay mostly separate and get a different look.  I wish the colors had stayed brighter all over instead of just in spots, but I think next time we’ll be more generous with the dye and see if that helps!

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Revenge of the 5th!! Free Star Wars Joke Printable

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Yesterday, the 4th May have been with you…but today it’s Revenge of the 5th! Never fear–we’ve got your back! Keep the Dark Side at bay with this free joke printable!

Click on this link for the printable —> Star Wars jokes. Print your page as a two sided document (Page 1 on the front, Page 2 on the back). Use card stock for extra durability, but regular paper works great, too! Cut around each shape, and get ready to giggle your way through the galaxy!

 

Time To Travel – Day 9

Check out today’s AWESOME looks from Stacey at From-a-Box || Maegen at Mae & K

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The eBook is on sale through the end of the tour (5/1/15) and for a limited time, we have exclusive discount codes for Mabel Madison and Fat Quarter Shop that are only available to those why buy the eBook. You can pick up your copy through our site or through Etsy – it is already marked down – no coupon code needed!

We also have a giveaway for you – there will be three lucky winners:

Grand prize: $50 gift certificate to FabricWorm and a copy of Time to Travel*

2nd: 1 yard of fabric from Mabel Madison and a copy of Time to Travel*

3rd: a copy of Time to Travel*

*If you buy the eBook and win the giveaway, we will either refund your money, or send the copy on to a friend of your choice.

But that’s not all! If you buy the eBook during the tour, you’ll be automatically entered to win a $30 gift certificate to Fat Quarter Shop!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

April 20: Rachel at Once Upon A Sewing Machine || Michelle at Falafel and the Bee

April 21: Becca at Free Notion || Heather at All Things Katy!

April 22: Chelsea at GYCT Designs || Ula at Lulu & Celeste

April 23: Stephanie at Swoodson Says || Sherri at Thread Riding Hood

April 24: Meriel at Create3.5 || Sara at Made by Sara

April 27: Melissa at Oh Sew Boy! || Stacey at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

April 28: Teri at Climbing the Willow || Ajaire at Call Ajaire

April 29: Jessica at The Berry Bunch || Dana at Sew Thrifty

April 30: Stacey at From-a-Box || Maegen at Mae & K

May 1: Kelly at Handmade Boy || Roxanne at Pen, Seb & Rox

 

 

Time To Travel – Day 5

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Create 3.5

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Made by Sara

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Made By Sara

It is hard to believe that we are already through the first week of the Time To Travel Blog Tour. There have been so many great projects this week.
Today we have Meriel at Create3.5 || Sara at Made by Sara

The eBook is on sale through the end of the tour (5/1/15) and for a limited time, we have exclusive discount codes for Mabel Madison and Fat Quarter Shop that are only available to those why buy the eBook. You can pick up your copy through our site or through Etsy – it is already marked down – no coupon code needed!

We also have a giveaway for you – there will be three lucky winners:

Grand prize: $50 gift certificate to FabricWorm and a copy of Time to Travel*

2nd: 1 yard of fabric from Mabel Madison and a copy of Time to Travel*

3rd: a copy of Time to Travel*

*If you buy the eBook and win the giveaway, we will either refund your money, or send the copy on to a friend of your choice.

But that’s not all! If you buy the eBook during the tour, you’ll be automatically entered to win a $30 gift certificate to Fat Quarter Shop!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

April 20: Rachel at Once Upon A Sewing Machine || Michelle at Falafel and the Bee

April 21: Becca at Free Notion || Heather at All Things Katy!

April 22: Chelsea at GYCT Designs || Ula at Lulu & Celeste

April 23: Stephanie at Swoodson Says || Sherri at Thread Riding Hood

April 24: Meriel at Create3.5 || Sara at Made by Sara

April 27: Melissa at Oh Sew Boy! || Stacey at Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts

April 28: Teri at Climbing the Willow || Ajaire at Call Ajaire

April 29: Jessica at The Berry Bunch || Dana at Sew Thrifty

April 30: Stacey at From-a-Box || Maegen at Mae & K

May 1: Kelly at Handmade Boy || Roxanne at Pen, Seb & Rox

 

 

Superhero Cape Tutorial in 30 Minutes or Less

Sewing With Boys 30 Minute Super Hero Cape Tutorial

Fuel up your boy’s imagination in no time flat with this quick and easy 30 minute superhero cape tutorial. Girls aren’t the only ones that love to dress up, so do boys. This would be the perfect project for your boy to sew with you, since it requires minimum sewing. Just imagine how proud your boy will be flying around the yard in a superhero cape he made!! (These also make a terrific gift for your boy to make for his friends!)

Supplies needed :

  • Rectangle of Fabric (this would be a great use of an old pillowcase.)
  • Scraps for Initial and Background
  • Scraps of Fusible Interweave
  • Small Square of Velcro

Sewing With Boys 30 Minute Super Hero Cape Tutorial

1. Lay out your rectangle of fabric and make sure it isn’t too long for your child and that it is the width you want the bottom of the cape to be.
2. Now you are going to make your cape shape. Fold your fabric in half lengthwise. Use a long ruler and make an angle starting at the width you want the top of the cape to be. End your angle at the bottom outside corner of your cape.
3. You are going to cut the straps from your scrap triangle of fabrics you have left from cutting out the main cape piece.
4. I cut mine from the middle of the scrap piece and cut it about 8 inches long, your length will depend on your child’s size.

 

30 Minute Superhero Cape by Knot Sew Normal  Next you will cut out your background shape and your initial out of fusible interweave, make sure you cut out your letter in reverse. Iron the shapes to your scrap fabric and cut them out. I used pinking shears to cut mine out to add a little interest. Iron your background and then your letter to your cape and stitch in place using either a zig-zag stitch or a straight stitch close to the edge.

30 Minute Superhero Cape by Knot Sew Normal Next you are going to finish the edges of your cape and your strap pieces. I used my Serger, if you don’t have a serger then just use a zig-zag stitch right along the edges of all three pieces. (ignore my ugly serged stitches here, I didn’t realize that one of my needle threads wasn’t secure and I ended up with loopy threads on the back and I had to redo them.)
1. After you finish your edges you are going to fold over the top edge of the cape to the wrong side of the cape and stitch around the 2 sides and the bottom.
2. Place your strap pieces along the top outside edges of the cape beside the top piece you folded down.
3. Attach your straps by first using a straight stitch and then going over with your zig-zag stitch several times to reinforce the straps.
4. Place your hook and loop tape on each of the strap pieces and stitch in to place.

***For the final step just put your cape on your child and watch them transform into a superhero right in front of your eyes!!

Sewing With Boys 30 Minute Super Hero Cape Tutorial

 

 

Sewing With Boys Blog Contributor Interview: Nichole Gifford

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Hi, I’m Nichole! I’m one of the contributors for Sewing With Boys…want to know a little bit more about me? Read on!

How long have you been sewing?I learned how to sew from my mom when I was in my teens. My family used to be Civil War re-enactors, so my mom taught my sister and I how to sew our own Civil War gowns to wear to the re-enactments!

How many boys do you sew for? How old are they? (Husbands count!) I sew for my son, who is 4, and a bit for my husband! (Though he is former military, so has a pretty good handle on  doing his own sewing!)

What is your favorite item you have sewn for your boy/boys?

For my husband, I made an epic button down Star Trek shirt, after being inspired by one I saw on a Facebook sewing page. I felt so intimidated when I started out, but I took it one step at a time, and it came together beautifully! (Notice I didn’t say “perfectly” 😉 Overall, I was thrilled…and he wears it with pride!

For my son, it’s hard to say…I think every piece I make my children has a special meaning, because it’s made specifically for them, right down to their personalities!

Having said that, one of my favorite pieces is actually quite simple: his Christmas stocking. I made the pattern for his (and his sister’s) based off of my childhood stocking, which my mom made for me. I hand stitched the little stars and buttons on the front, thinking of all the women in my family that have hand stitched before me. Every year, when I pull the stockings out, I feel a bit triumphant that I am continuing the handmade love for the next generation. It is my hope that I can help them do the same for their own children, and that I will be able to let them know, it doesn’t have to be complicated to be meaningful!

Self-drafted Christmas Stocking

What do you think are the biggest obstacles in sewing for boys?

I think the biggest obstacle is finding inspiration for new twists on classic looks. For girls, you can always add lace, ribbons, ruffles…make it a skirt instead of pants, or add gathers. Boy items are very basic and timeless. It’s easy for me to get stuck in a rut, or to find myself thinking, why bother? He already owns 25 tees…how will this one be any different? I just have to continuously remind myself to be on the lookout for a way to make it unique to him, you know?

Heat Transfer Appliqued Tee

Where is your favorite place to buy fabric for boys?

I’ve had luck in tons of places, from upcycling at thrift stores and bargain-minded big box stores all the way to local and online specialty stores!

Fabric from Wal-Mart

Who are you favorite boy pattern designers?

I have dabbled in a bit of everyone’s patterns, but I love the styling of Patterns for Pirates, and the instructions from Sis Boom Patterns and Oliver + S are hard to beat!

What are your favorite sewing with boy resource(blog, books, etc)?

Again, it’s hard to choose favorites…but I’ve loved my Sewing For Boys book, and I love to check in on the boy-sewing themed Facebook pages to see what’s new!

Treasure Pocket Pants from Sewing For Boys

Do you sew with the boys in your life? If so, what do you make with them?

My son’s sewing interest right now lies mainly in using my fabric yardage as blankets when I’m not looking! However, we all begin at the very beginning, so he’s been enjoying lacing cards and stringing beads…things that will add up to getting behind the machine when he’s ready!

“I’m sorry, how is this *not* a blanket, Mom?”

Why do you think it is important to teach boys to sew?

Just as there’s no reason for my daughter not to learn to change the oil on her car, there’s no reason for my son not to learn how to sew. They’re life lessons that will serve my children equally well. Not only is sewing a tool that helps prepare my son for real-world situations in the future, it is an outlet of creative expression, should he choose to employ it was such.

What would you like to see more of in the Boy Sewing world? (patterns, tutorials, fabric, etc)

I would love to continue seeing more spins on the classic shirt/shorts/pants. Also, I would love to continue seeing our boys breaking out of pre-established garment molds. You want to be Elsa for Halloween, son? You bet!

How do you challenge yourself to break gender stereotypes when sewing for your boy?

My son loves all the things his big sister loves. Plus, he’s really tall for his age. These two things might not seem related, but they are when it comes to breaking stereotypes in sewing. If he wants superhero pants with a matching shirt to wear, he gets one (despite strangers commenting that his outfit looks like pajamas). If his current favorite color is pink, he gets pink (did you know that pink used to be the preferred color for young boys?) I love sewing things for my family to thoroughly enjoy, specifically created with them in mind !

Butler Britches from Brownie Goose

What (or who) inspires your boy sewing?

Of course, my son inspires me…but my husband does, too. From the moment we met, he’s always stressed that people do not fit into a certain category…that he believes each person should be true to their own self. He’s always been our family’s biggest supporter. He inspires me to keep on creating for my family, because he’s always telling us that who we are, in every phase of life, is exactly who we should be. (Yes, he is pretty amazing!)


Tell us a bit about your favorite boy(s)!

My son and his father are both ridiculously charming! The two of them are honest, smart, and funny…many times without even trying to be! My son is still at an age where wonder is one of his main emotions, and my husband is often the one who is beside him, encouraging it!

Tell us about your blog and what inspired you to start it.

My blog, Bluebird & the Boy, began when my son was a baby. I wanted a place to document the items I was creating for my family, so that I could look back and see what I was accomplishing…during a time where, with two small children at home, I felt like I wasn’t accomplishing much on a day to day basis!

‘Bluebird’ refers to our beautiful daughter, and of course, our dapper little son is ‘the Boy’!

Heat N’ Bond “Love” Sister/Brother Set

Junior Tool Belt Tutorial

If there’s one thing my boy likes to do, it’s to help out! (In as many ways as possible!) Recently, we put together a new play set in our yard, and my little man was all about Daddy’s tools!

With that in mind, I’d like to share with you a tutorial for a Junior Tool Belt…perfect for the little handyboy in your house! 

I created this easy-on belt for my son, who has recently taken an interest in all things TOOL. I wanted him to have his own special place to store his gear, and I wanted him to have complete control over all of it…from loading it up, to putting it on and taking it off again. This tool belt fits the bill with an elastic waist in the back, and a removable tool pocket in the front. 


Sounds ideal, right? Not having to stop what you’re doing to fasten/unfasten little dress up parts at the whim of your preschooler (or even, if we’re being honest, your grade schooler)? Yeah it does! Let’s get started! 


We’re going to begin by gathering measurements and materials. 


What you’ll need:

1/2 yard material for belt 

(this is a generous estimate to encompass all junior sizes)

1/4 yard of 2″ elastic 

3″ of velcro

fusible interfacing (for lighter weight fabrics)

regular sewing supplies/notions


Begin by measuring your child’s waist.


*Tip: When measuring your child’s waist, remember that this belt will be worn over clothing. I recommend you measure over the waistband of his bulkiest pants. 


Now, there’s a little math involved to figure out cutting lengths, but trust me…if I can do it, you can do it! 


In my example, we will use a starting waist measurement of 24 inches, and plan for a 1/2″ seam allowance throughout. Also, I have decided I want 5 inches of elastic in the back of my belt (before seam allowances.) 


24″ (waist) – 5″ (elastic) = 19″ (belt material) 


Based on these measurements:

cut 2 pieces of main material, 19″w x 3″l

cut 2 pieces of fusible interfacing, 19″w x 3″l (if needed) 

cut 1 piece of 2″ elastic, 6″w

cut 2 pieces of main material 2″w x 5″l (for loops)


*Tip: Note that an inch has been added on to the elastic cut to accommodate the seam allowance, but not onto the main material cut. Losing an inch to seam allowance on the material will give the belt a snug fit, and keep it from slipping down. Feel free to remove another inch, if you’ve got a junior with an extra slim build.


When the belt pieces have been cut, apply the fusible interfacing as needed.

Before we put our belt together, let’s create some tool holding loops.


Begin by ironing the 2″ x 5″ pieces in half, wrong sides together, to create a crease in the middle (1).  

Open the pieces back up, and refold each edge piece in (wrong sides together) to meet at the crease in the middle (2). 

Fold the piece in half again on the middle crease (3) and (4). 

Edge stitch from top to bottom to hold in place (5). 


Now, let’s place them on the belt. 


A quick way to find the middle of your belt piece is to fold it in half, and pinch it to make a crease. Using that as a marker, measure outward the desired distance (4″ in this example) on either side of the middle, and pin your loop in place on the back layer. Make sure the loop is facing towards the belt so that it will be sandwiched in between the upper and back belt layers. Pin the upper layer to the back layer, and stitch across the length of both the top and bottom widths. Trim seam allowances, and use the open ends to turn the belt right side out. Press the belt. 


Fold back the open edges and clip the corners of the seam allowances. This will make it easier to place the elastic. Turn the edges of the belt in, wrong sides together. This makes a nice folded edge in which to slide your elastic. Push the elastic in 1/2″. You may have to wiggle it just so, but it will fit! Sew it into place using 1/4″ seam allowance, and repeat on the opposite side. 

Top stitch the belt main fabric. 

Ta da! You are finished with the belt! On to the removable pocket!

The space between my loops measured 6″. In this example, I wanted my pocket to be 5.5″ wide x 6″ long. 


Based on these measurements:

cut 2 pieces 6.5″ w x 7″ l (pocket back pieces)

-repeat with interfacing, if needed

cut 2 pieces 6.5″ w x 5″ l (pocket front pieces)

-repeat with interfacing, if needed


Once the interfacing has been applied, lay the back pocket pieces on top of each other, right sides together. Using a 1/2″ seam allowance, stitch around the four edges, leaving about a 2″ gap to turn. Clip corners and trim seam allowances. Turn right side out and press. Repeat with the front pocket pieces, then add top stitching on the top of the pocket front piece.

Lay the pocket front piece on top of the pocket back piece. Make sure the gap on the pocket back piece is at the bottom of the pocket. Pin into place. 

Stitch around the three outer sides, beginning at the top of one side, and ending at the top of the other side. 


All that’s left now is to place the velcro! 

Cut two pieces, each 1.5″ long. 

Using the back side of the pocket, place the hook velcro 1/2″ in from the side edges, pin, and sew into place. 

I used those pieces to help me line up the loop pieces on the front of the belt. Pin into place and sew. 


And there you have it! Your very own (I-Can-Do-It-Mom!) Junior Tool Belt! 


Now, your little man can walk around wearing this sweet tool belt and singing Weird Al’s “I’m So Handy” all the livelong day, too!

Happy Sewing!

(This post was previously featured over at Sew McCool.)





Boy Sewing Blogger Interview: Maegen Foster

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Maegen's Close UpHello there Sewing With Boys readers! I’m Maegen from Mae & K, and I’m so excited to be here today. The SWB blog and facebook group is a community I’m really loving already, and I’m so honored that Addie contacted me for an interview.

How long have you been sewing?

I honestly can’t remember when I first learned to sew. I do remember my first solo project, a simple quilt, I was about 12 and I listened to a book called Bat 6 while I cut and laid out the blocks. My sister uses the quilt now, and I love seeing it in her room.

As for sewing clothing, after my oldest was born I really wanted to sew things for him to wear. I had a ton of failed projects the first few months, but it didn’t deter me at all.

However, practice makes perfect, right? I got better at sewing with everything I made, and a lot of things have been passed down to child number two.

CraftingCon: Mischief Managed | Mae & K

Mischief Managed Tee

How many boys do you sew for? How old are they? (Husbands count!)

I mainly sew for my two little guys, Mack (3) and Baden (1). I did make my husband a capote, and hopefully soon I’ll get brave enough to sew more for him.

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What is your favorite item you have sewn for your boy/boys?

Now that is a hard question! My Mack the Knife outfit was my absolute favorite, until I pulled it out for Baden to wear. Oh, there were so many mistakes! I still love the style though.

Project Run & Play: Look out, old Macky is back! | Mae & K

Baden in the Mack the Knife outfit

Mack has a Knight Hoodie he just loves to wear, and a “shake it off” shirt he loves as well. The excitement he has about wearing those probably make them my current favorites.

Perfect Pattern Parcel: The Knight Hoodie | Mae & K

Knight Hoodie

What do you think are the biggest obstacles in sewing for boys?

It’s just more difficult. I was watching season 4 of Project Runway All-Stars, and they had a challenge where some of them had to do menswear, you would not believe the negative reactions! I was honestly shocked and appalled.

I think the intricacy of sewing for boys is one of the appeals for me. Anyone can sit down and whip out a rectangle skirt with an elastic waistband, but it takes more time to make even something simple for a boy, which is why I think most people shy away from it. Or they think it’s boring, or not as cute. Sewing for boys is definitely not boring, and it is definitely just as cute! A simple tee can be decorated a million ways with stencils. I have a few on my site you can download free.

August Mystery Challenge: Solar System | Mae & K

Constellation Shirts

For those of you that haven’t ever done freezer paper stenciling, I have a tutorial from when I made this Captain America shirt.

CraftingCon: Captain America | Mae & K

 

Where is your favorite place to buy fabric for boys?

I order from fabric.com pretty frequently, but most of my fabric is repurposed from clothing. So I love to “shop” my husband’s closet, and thrift stores. Almost everything I make has some thrifted elements. I have a plaid jersey sheet I’ve made a ton of different things with.

Mack in his football themed outfit

Nathan’s old high school practice jersey got a new life.

Who are you favorite boy pattern designers?

I don’t really have a favorite. I have several basic patterns, and I’m learning to draft patterns myself. Hopefully sometime soon I’ll have a little collection of awesome boy patterns.

What are your favorite sewing with boy resource(blog, books, etc)?

Well obviously Sewing With Boys is awesome! There are some neat facebook groups as well. Amy from Friends Stitched Together does a lot of great boy sewing, with tons of fun details. There’s really a great community out there.

Do you sew with the boys in your life? If so, what do you make with them?

Not yet, haha. Mostly right now their involvement with my sewing is, “DON”T TOUCH THAT!” in reference to my ginghers, my serger, the iron, etc. Though sometimes Mack will sit on my lap while I sew. It makes everything take longer, but I like letting him spend the time with me.

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Mack also gets to make requests for fabric and gives me ideas of what to make. He loves Darth Vader, and that inspired this tee.

CraftingCon: Dark Side Shirt | Mae & K

Dark Side Tee

Why do you think it is important to teach boys to sew?

A friend of mine has an older brother who once tried to reattach a button to a nice dress shirt with an iron… ‘nuff said! Even if it’s just a basic knowledge, boys need to know how to sew every bit as much as girls do. My husband has a basic knowledge, and has expressed an interest in learning more, which makes me really happy!

What would you like to see more of in the Boy Sewing world? (patterns, tutorials, fabric, etc)

More fabrics for sure! I mean, more of everything, but I feel like more patterns and tutorials are already in the works from some of the awesome boy sewing bloggers. But I’d truly love to see more boy fabrics. I have a thing for plaids and stripes, you can never have too many options! I’d also love to see more superhero fabric, so I don’t have to make my own, haha.

Embellish for Boys Guest Post | Mae & K

Captain America Jammies

How do you challenge yourself to break gender stereotypes when sewing for your boy(s)?

I just recently made Mack a “Shake it Off” inspired shirt, and a pink tie. I am pretty conservative, so you won’t be seeing my boys in dresses, but I don’t let gender stereotypes stop me if I get an idea I like.

Shake it Off | Mae & K

Boys Can Wear Pink | Mae & K

Boys Can Wear Pink

What (or who) inspires your boy sewing?

I find inspiration everywhere. Sometimes a particular pattern speaks, sometimes I find things on pinterest I love. Sometimes fabrics demand to be made into certain items, and sometimes I get requests. And there are so many great challenges out there. CraftingCon is so much fun, and I love participating in other blog tours.

Spring Break Outfit

This Spring Break outfit started with a pair of shoes.

My Boy Sewing inspiration board is full, full, full of pea coats and jackets.

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Thrifted Wool Pea Coat

Tell us a bit about your favorite boy(s)!

Mack is a really fun kid. He loves to play cars, have dance parties and snuggle on your lap to read a big pile of books.

Mack the Ham

Baden, aka Ziggity Pants, is our mischevious monster. He gets into everything, and we have to keep the front door locked or he will be three houses down before you realize he’s gone. And he loves his rabbit.

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My husband loves to hunt and fish, and that definitely inspires my boy sewing style. He’s also big into scouting, and camping, two more big inspirations for me.

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Tell us about your blog and what inspired you to start it.

I first started blogging when I was 16, just random things. After I had Mack my sister-in-law Karen told me about a blog she liked to read called No Big Dill. From there I discovered a huge world of inspiration for sewing, and I started sewing along with Project Run & Play, and really getting involved in the larger blogging world.

van Gogh Dress icon

Last March Karen and I launched Mae & K. We blog mostly about our crafting adventures. I currently have Monday set aside for CraftingCon guest posts, and we have a weekly Free Pattern Friday post.

Free pattern friday

Launching the new blog inspired me to put a lot of my ideas into action. I mentioned my idea for CraftingCon on Facebook and got an awesome response from Amy and Tasha so we partnered up. That has been an amazing experience. I can’t believe it’s been nearly a year!

CraftingCon: I'm a Keeper | Mae & K

I’m a Keeper Jammies

Blogging keeps me from having a clean house, but it gives me a wonderful creative outlet. Not to mention all the new things I’ve learned; blogging forces me to expand my knowledge of writing, sewing, photography and computer code. I’ve made a ton of great “blogging friends,” and had such a wonderful experience blogging.

Thanks so much Addie, Amy, Jonie, and Nichole for having me here today! It was a lot of fun to do the interview. I love the Sewing With Boys website, and I know it will be a fabulous source of inspiration for people sewing for their boys!